comicbookgrrrl:

A lovely friend of mine sent me a couple of Starblazer issues written by Grant Morrison this week - including his first one, #15, Algol the Terrible which Morrison also did the artwork for.

And Algol is of course the star that is also known as the Demon Star, the name deriving from the Arabic ‘ra’s al-ghūl’. Page 1 above shows the enemy spacecraft with the demon’s head emblem. Synchronicity!

Starblazer was a wee small format comics anthology in the UK, alongside sister publication Commando (which is still going strong today).

Morrison did his own artwork for other comics too: his Near Myths stories, and his Captain Clyde strip. He switched to writing only when he made the jump to mainstream comics for the sake of time.

Starfighter Affinity Group

image

This is the pitch for Starblazer Adventures:

Five standard months ago, the Memnos system won its independence and declared itself the Republic of Free Mining Communities. Five standard minutes ago, the Republic decided it needed a navy and appointed you. Unsurprisingly, there are some problems with this arrangement.

Strictly speaking, you’re not a navy at all. You are the Starfighter Affinity Group, an autonomous collective that operates within the framework of the Popular Defense Committees but caucuses independently. No one knows just what this means or how it’s supposed to work.

Worse yet, it’s hard to be the navy when you don’t have any ships. There are plenty of ships around- this is the asteroid belt, after all- but none of them are yours. The three traditional remedies for this situation are beg, borrow or steal, but whatever you do, you’d better get on it. Raiders are attacking your outlying habitats and imperial scouts are probing your defenses.

Meanwhile, the Republic is struggling to get itself organized. It’s only five months old, and is on its third government already. The large and constantly changing array of factions spend a lot of time arguing about autonomism and commensalism, but none of them can seem to keep the lights on and the mines operating. Your affinity group represents many factions, and they will all be pulling at you.

Finally, your revolution cannot survive if it remains confined to the belt. Asteroids are rich with resources, but you can’t eat rock. In order to survive in the face of imperial hostility, you need a broader economy, a greater population, a base of support for eternal resistance. You need to expand to neighboring star systems. You need allies and friends.

But first, of course, you need a ship.

More infos to follow.

EDIT: Check out the starblazer tag.

image

Read More

alexander-kaene-deactivated2013 asked: Hi I'm working on a CT setting that takes place in our solar system, I've destroyed Earth, and all drives travel in AU's not parsecs. I was just wondering if you had any ideas or suggestions on what I could do with the planets Haumea and Varuna?

This sounds like an interesting setting. Do the basics of Jump remain the same other than distance? That makes Kuiper Belt planets pretty remote, in addition to inhospitable.

It’s hard to answer without knowing more about the background, but here are a few ideas.

1. I like placing cults in remote locations. For a human-centric, sol-centric campaign, you might try a cult of someone like Yuri Gagarin. It’s good to make them mysterious and reclusive- saves you the trouble of figuring them out until they’re needed.

2. If you’re down with trans-humanism, these would be the places for the most extreme version. Lots of stuff we evolved on Earth is pretty pointless out there. Maybe people are optimized for low-light, low-pressure, low-g; or maybe their brains are transplanted into biomechanical bodies at birth and they live in hard vacuum. Throw Shapers and Mechanists in a blender with a little bit of Timothy Leary and you’ve got plenty of options.

3. No human has ever traveled this far. There are only robotic colonies mining volatiles for the inner system. But when all contact is lost with the colonies, some poor sap is going to have to go investigate.

4. We’re building planets! The Haumeans are devoted to gathering as much matter as they can and building up the planet. In just a few hundred years, they might clear their orbit and build something they can live on.

5. Varuna is the jumping-off point for a scheme to colonize the Oort Cloud. If the cloud extends far enough to overlap with the cloud of the nearest star, maybe we can eventually spread out among the stars in jumps of a few light-minutes at a time. It may take thousands of years to build, but who’s in a hurry now that we live forever? (I don’t think the physics work out on this one, but it’s a fun enough idea to make it work if you want.)

Just five random ideas. I hope one of them is of use.

wilwheaton:

jenniferdeguzman:

He said Star Trek is too “philosophical”? Screw that noise.

mechcanuck:

I don’t know when this interview happened but I AM SAD AND ANGRY NOW 

The philosophies in Star Trek are kinda part of the actual setting. If you don’t get that, why are you allowed to make Star Trek movies.

Sigh. The whole point of Star Trek is that it’s philosophical. If you don’t want philosophical Science Fiction, there’s plenty of that for you to enjoy, but Star Trek is philosophical. Philosophy is part of Star Trek’s DNA, and if you’re given the captain’s chair, you’d better damn well respect that.

I’ve been meaning to write up my feelings about the last Star Trek movie before the new one comes out, but this sums up exactly how Abrams went about taking a giant shit all over it. It was a good sci fi action-adventure flick, but it was terrible Star Trek.

(Source: catbushandludicrous)

More recent re-reads. I just glanced at the first one for a minute and suddenly, boom, had to read the whole thing. I stopped with the first three for now. If I go back to Douglas Adams soon, though, it’ll be for Dirk Gently, not the rest of the Hitchhiker books.

This was excellent. It’s from 1956, but it reads like something much more sophisticated than most sci fi was doing at the time. I’d say Bester beats Heinlein to the task of humanizing science fiction by half a decade or so, but he wasn’t quite prolific or popular enough to claim the pivotal role that usually gets assigned to Heinlein.
I will be looking for more Bester to read pretty soon.

This was excellent. It’s from 1956, but it reads like something much more sophisticated than most sci fi was doing at the time. I’d say Bester beats Heinlein to the task of humanizing science fiction by half a decade or so, but he wasn’t quite prolific or popular enough to claim the pivotal role that usually gets assigned to Heinlein.

I will be looking for more Bester to read pretty soon.

brighter-suns:


Elmore


What is this from? I suddenly discover I have fond memories of this picture, but I can’t remotely remember the source.

brighter-suns:

Elmore

What is this from? I suddenly discover I have fond memories of this picture, but I can’t remotely remember the source.

It’s the TARDIS swimming pool!

In the beginning of The Invasion Of Time, Leela storms off because the Doctor is being a dick. She eventually turns up in the pool, playing with an inflatable frog.

Later, a renegade Timelord helps the Sontarans break into the TARDIS, and they pursue the Doctor, Leela and Andred through lots of brick corridors and dingy workshops that look suspiciously like the BBC basement. Andred boldly holds them off with a pool chair (these are pretty inept Sontarans).

Later, there’s a sketchy-looking art gallery, a sketchier sick bay and a garden with a giant venus flytrap. Meanwhile, the Doctor’s Timelord mentor settles in by the pool, and manages to find himself a newspaper heralding the sinking of the Titanic, a blue beverage and a silly straw.

oldschoolfrp:

Four new Troubleshooters from Alpha Complex bravely explore the mythical zone known as Outdoors, where they encounter a small furry alien holding a tiny oval object of unknown purpose.

(James Holloway illustrations from Paranoia: Player Handbook, West End Games, 1984.)

Library Data: The Third Imperium

LBB9: Library Data, Mongoose Publishing, 2011.

Third Imperium (0 to present): Also called The Imperium. Founded in 0 by Cleon Zhunastu from the Sylean Federation of what is now Core sector. The Imperium grew swiftly during the early Pacification Campaigns, and then more slowly thereafter until stability was reached in the 600’s, by which time the Imperium had absorbed much of the territory of the First and Second Imperiums.

The Imperium can be best thought of as a form of feudal confederation. Member worlds of the Imperium agree to pay taxes and obey a few fundamental laws that the Imperium promulgates, known as the High Laws. In return, the Imperium agrees to patrol the space between the worlds, to protect interstellar trade, to encourage travel and commerce and to arbitrate diplomatic relations between worlds. Beyond this, individual worlds are left to their own devices so long as they acknowledge the power of the Imperium to rule the space between the stars.

Imperial power is present on member worlds in the form of consulates, bureaucratic offices and bases. Sometimes, larger enclaves of Imperial power are placed where they can enhance the emperor’s strength.